Slow Play in Golf: It's a Game of Precision But Should Never Be Slow

Slow Play Golf

End slow play in golf

The game of golf rewards precision, but a growing problem in the game is the rise of slow play in golf. “Slow play” refers to the scenario where too much space on the course has opened up between one group and the group following them.

Clubs have different rules regarding slow play, but often the difference allowed is one hole. Any more and you’re guilty of slow play.

Some clubs penalize; others do not. Regardless of your club's rules, the important thing is that out of courtesy to other golfers, and for your own enjoyment of this great game, you keep up the pace.

It's important to know that taking your time in golf doesn't help you play better, in fact a faster golfer is more likely to execute a perfect golf swing

>> If you like this, you'll also like: How to Eliminate Slow Play in Golf & Play 4 Hour Rounds

Where the problem lies

The problem is especially common among amateur golfers. When I'm golfing, I concentrate 100% on my swing. There's that perfect moment as you lift the club for a swing that you know is going to connect – and that satisfying thwack! as you hit the ball towards wherever it's destined to go. But, standing there, trying to perfect your swing on the course isn’t going to work nor is it the best sportsmanship.

Instead, it's best to work on your swing when you're not on the course. Go to the driving range and put in the time. After a while, decisively making that perfect swing will come naturally to you.

It's like weightlifting – someone who wants perfect form on the bench press will start with just the bar.

 

WATCH THE VIDEO BELOW THAT DEMONSTRATES HOW TO DEAL WITH SLOW PLAY ON THE GOLF COURSE:

 

What you can do

I can't speak enough about the satisfaction that comes with developing your own style – a swing that comes so naturally to you, you don't have to spend time “eyeing the ball” for that perfect shot. There's a craftsman-like appeal to that – I am very comfortable with a golf club in my hand: that's how I make my shots quickly and get on with the game.

One way to learn how to play quickly is to look at the pros. PGA Tour rules dictate that each player has 40 seconds to make a shot, except in certain circumstances where that number goes up to 60 seconds.

Watch their swing – most importantly, watch their confidence in their swing. They make it happen, and they make it happen quickly.

“Rob Peers, pro golfer”, may not be in my list of achievements (yet!), but from years of watching the Tour I understand something of the mindset of a pro.

Be confident

It's all about confidence – fast play is great, not just because it shows consideration for others on the course, but because it comes from within. You know exactly what you're doing, so you don't have to take time. Instead of worrying about the logistics, just make your swing – if you're good enough, it will be a hole in one. If you're not, work on your swing later. Just don't stress about it as you are playing!

Like to take it slow? Consider playing alone. Go early on an off day, when not many people are on the course.

Even if you’re a fast golfer, golfing alone can be a special treat. You're removed from all the daily concerns of life; it's just you, your ball, and the green.

That sublime level of focus is seldom found in a busy life. The experience the solo golfer has is something like meditation – but even better, because he has the whole green to himself.

One of the best parts of golf are the amazing courses all over the world; while I love fast play, I acknowledge some of them are best enjoyed slowly.

If you want to know how to end slow play in golf you need to look at why it's slow in the first place. Stop slow play in golf and get through your round of golf quicker and make it more enjoyable.

Fast golf is for you

There's the mental approach I take to golf that keeps me playing fast.

Slow play in golf is no fun for anyone!

As a passionate player, I have a dedicated philosophy about fast golf. But don't worry too much about the specifics – just have fun and remember, keep it moving.

This post was written by our guest writer Rob Peers. Rob is a financial and business consultant who lives in Calgary, Canada. 

Rob loves sharing his knowledge of golf and loves playing the sport even more.


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